Other vehicles in our May 20, 2017 auction

 

Chrysler
Viper Venom Roadster

Jaguar
E-Type Series I Roadster ‘Flat Floor’

Bentley
S3 Standard Steel Saloon

Ford
Escort Mk.I

Austin-Healey
3000 Mk.II BT7

Ducati
851 Strada

Ducati
916S Monoposto Europa

TVR
420 SEAC

Range Rover
by Wood and Pickett 'The Harrods Edition'

Porsche
356B Coupé

Morris
Mini Cooper S Mk. II

Jaguar
E-Type Series I Fixedhead Coupé

Jaguar
Mk. VIII Saloon

Jaguar
E-Type Series II Roadster (4.2 litre)

Volkswagen
T25 Camper

Jaguar
E-Type Series One Fixedhead Coupé (4.2 litre)

Jaguar
340 Saloon

Porsche
928 S4

Jaguar
XK120SE Drophead Coupé

Volkswagen
Split-Screen Camper Type 2

Jaguar
E-Type Series III V12

Triumph
Stag

Ford
Zephyr 6 Mk.I

Bentley
Mulsanne Turbo

Daimler
Sovereign Coupé (4.2 litre)

Volkswagen
182 Trekker

MG
Midget

BSA
Sunbeam Tigress 175cc

Triumph
GT6 (GT4) Aluminium Lightweight


Number plate: A6 JAY

Jaguar
XK140 SE Roadster

Citroën
SM

Vauxhall
Viva SL

Porsche
911/996 Cabriolet

Talbot
4CY 15/20 ‘The Qantas Flyer’

Ford
Mustang GT Wide-body '50th Anniversary Edition'

Alfa Romeo
2000 GTAm Evocation

Alfa Romeo
Giulia Super 1600 Rally Road

Porsche
911S (1968 m.y.)

Stanley
Vanderbilt Cup Racer

Morris
Minor 1000

Chevrolet
Corvette C2 Stingray

DeLorean
DMC-12

Rolls-Royce
Silver Cloud III

Morris
Mini Cooper Mk. I

Aston Martin
DB6 Mk. I Restoration

Alfa Romeo
1750 GTV

BMW
Isetta

Metmachex
Suzuki 1200

MG
B Roadster

Zhenhua
ZH-A50 Monkey Bike

Yamaha
TY250R

Triumph
Sprint ST 955i

BMW
Z3 Roadster

Mercedes-Benz
SL 320 Roadster

Mitsubishi
Evolution VIII GSR

Ford
C Ten Saloon

Packard
Patrician 400 Saloon

De Tomaso
Pantera (Group 4 specification)

Porsche
911 Carrera 4

Mercedes-Benz
190 SL Roadster

MG
B Roadster Competition

Austin-Healey
100/4 BN1

Alvis
TE21 Drophead Coupé by Park Ward

Ferrari
456GT

MG
Midget Mk. III

Triumph
Stag

Jaguar
E-Type Series I Roadster (3.8 litre)

Lotus
Esprit Turbo S4
 
 
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1967 Aston Martin DB6 Mk. I Restoration

 
 
 
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Registration SYP 301F
Chassis Number DB6/3167/R
Engine Number 4001/3213
Odometer reading 2,028 miles
Estimate No Reserve

The DB6 was launched at the London Motor Show in 1965 following on from the highly successful DB5 immortalised by the 1964 James Bond film 'Goldfinger'. The front end of the DB6 was visually similar to the DB5 but closer inspection revealed quite a different car. The wheelbase was lengthened allowing additional passenger space in the rear along with a raised roof line. The profile of the rear quarter lights echoed those of the DB4GT Zagato, a styling theme that continued through to the DBS and V8 models until production finished in 1990. Both front and rear bumpers were split into two pieces and the rear of the car was re-styled with a Kamm tail which helped reduce aerodynamic drag and gave the car more stability at speed. The engine remained the same as the Tadek Marek-designed DB5 unit, a 3,995cc twin overhead cam, straight six with triple SU carburettors producing a claimed 282bhp. 'If you want a truly British driver's car, the ultimate development of a continuous line of thoroughbreds from the Vintage era to the present day, there is nothing in quite the same field as the Aston.' - Motor Magazine on the Aston Martin DB6, 26th November 1966.

Flicking through the classic car magazines in Smiths, there are a plethora of shiny Astons for sale. I counted 16 DB's in one magazine alone before being forcibly ejected. The point is, rather like rocking horse do-do's; Aston Martin restoration projects are thin on the ground. It is therefore a huge pleasure to open a barn door and see, for the first time in years, the unmistakable lines of one of David Browns glorious creations. The story goes that the vendor received a telephone call in 2013 from an elderly gentleman in Wokingham purporting to have an 'Austin' in his garage. The house was being sold and the garages demolished, everything had to go. Our friend visited and, after an amicable arrangement was reached, left with the car on a trailer. The tax disc was last dated in 1982, some 35 years previously. It was again tucked away until today.

The body and wheel arches appear sound although rust was noticed on the underside of the doors and the Dubonnet Rosso paint is flat. Interestingly, some work has taken place in the engine bay. The crank turns with a spanner and the rocker covers have new gaskets. The dipstick shows brand-new oil and, with a spark plug out, the top of a shiny piston can be seen. Other gaskets are in evidence and a brand new expansion tank has been fitted. It looks like a rebuild but, obviously, a strip-down would need to take place to confirm.

The interior also has some definite good points; the carpets are worn and require replacing throughout. The leather dashboard top and headlining is in good order but the front seats are missing altogether. All five wire wheels are present and intact although corroded. It is driven through a factory Borg Warner automatic gearbox and, looking at the floors, they are good apart from a small area in the passenger footwell. A tool roll and minimal paperwork accompany this exciting discovery as well as an Aston Martin Heritage Certificate and build sheets. These go on to detail the factory power-steering, chrome roadwheels, heated  rear screen, three ear hub-caps, power aerial and two lap & diagonal safety belts.

Service work recorded back in 1970 appears to include a top-end rebuild and extensive service as well as a repair to the front bumper.

Whether you leave it in its delightfully faded-glory state and just overhaul the mechanics or treat her to the full spa treatment, the next stage of the story is just around the corner.